SPEED UP THE DEBATE

LETTER OF THE MONTH EMAIL: WHEELS@WHEELSMAG.COM.AU FA C E BO O K : W HEELS AUSTRA LI A

Graham Zerk, Cleveland, Qld

AS ONE who works in a hospital emergency department, I implore you to keep up the pressure to force our governments out of the one-dimensional stupor that dictates that sleep-inducing, mind-numbing speed limits are a panacea for road trauma.

As much as raising a speed limit results in less fatigue and greater concentration on the task at hand, we should be debating speed limits as both upper and lower levels.

When you observe the two extremes of speed on a highway, the driver travelling faster than everyone else is the only vehicle having to change lanes or vary speed, whereas a driver going slower than the prevailing traffic forces many others into lane changes, avoidance manoeuvres, and rate changes all of which can lead to accidents.

If you cannot travel at the low speeds we call the limit on our highways there is something wrong with you, your vehicle, or both.