ONES THAT GOT AWAY

CLIFF CHAMBERS

GET YOU FIRED UP THE CARS WE SHOULD HAVE BOUGHT OR ARE JUST GLAD WE DIDN’T...

Tell us in 60 words the car you should have bought, or were lucky enough to buy!

CLASSIC CAR AUCTIONS FIND YOUR NEXT CLASSIC CAR AT:

1957 FORD SKYLINER I never have been a fan of a soft top US convertibles but back in the 80’s I struck across a ‘57 Skyliner in rural Victoria for $7K! She was a decent driver in black and gold original paint and that huge roof worked. Why did I let it get away from me.

MICKY BOSSNO - WARRANDYTE, VIC

NOW $6950 $40-45,000

FEBRUARY 2001 ALFA-ROMEO GIULIA GTV

It’s hard to find a better-proportioned car than Bertone’s Giulia GT, yet until a few years ago these evocative Alfas were relatively cheap. The first 105-Series GTs arrived here in 1964 and very few of the earliest cars seem to remain. This one with its correct drilled wheels and hubcaps is a later GTV version, identified by little green cloverleaf badges (‘quadrifoglio’) on the rear pillars. GTVs were made famous by very nearly beating Ford’s V8 Falcons to the Bathurst 500 flag in 1967.

SINCE THEN: It took a long time but 1960s Alfa coupes have finally started making decent money for their patient owners. Excellent 1600GTs are hard to find locally but represent value at under $50,000.

NOW $295,000 $1.2-1.4M 2 1

JANUARY 2001 TOYOTA 2000GT

Japan’s dominant car-maker should have by now developed a string of evocative sports cars but this remains as the only truly spectacular Toyota. It was unashamedly an answer to the Jaguar E Type but sat on a Lotus-style chassis. Its engine was half the size of the Jag’s but the GT was just as fast. Sales during the past decade have been strong but nothing until recently had cracked the $1 million mark – US$1.15 million to be exact. Australia once was home to several 2000GTs but they seem to now be gone.

SINCE THEN: It is four years since the record US$1.15M price for a 2000GT was set but we suspect Japan’s most significant collector car is just resting before taking the next big step towards collectible greatness.

NOW $135,000 $ 320- 350,000 13 35

JUNE 1997 JAGUAR E TYPE ROADSTER

Yes folks, $135,000 in 1997 was a huge amount of money for an E Type. Even in today’s market it is more than a typical Roadster will generate but this is no ordinary 3.8-litre Drophead. A very early ‘flat-floor’ version, this car was restored for a once-wealthy Gold Coast property developer – a genuine ‘cost no object’ exercise undertaken by one of the country’s most prominent Jaguar specialists. Your columnist was fortunate to judge it at one event where it took the top award and the its standard of presentation was extraordinary.

SINCE THEN: Cars of this standard command special prices and for comparisons we need to look at sales of exceptional early E Types that can exceed US$250,000 when auctioned overseas.

$8990 $20-27,000

JUNE 2006 JAGUAR XJ6 4.2 SERIES 1

2018 will mark the 50th Anniversary of Jaguar’s XJ6 and finding excellent, authentic cars has become a struggle.

During the 1990s it was trendy to drop a V8 into the engine bay then scrap the car because its authenticity was compromised. This Damson Red example seems to have escaped intact and comes with the added attraction of air-conditioning. Restoring a worn-out XJ can cost $60,000 so finding one in this condition for less than $9000 would have sent Jag enthusiasts scampering.

SINCE THEN: Finding an outstanding first-Series XJ in authentic condition remains very difficult. As people come to realise the brilliance of this design, demand has grown and so too prices.

$35,500 300- 340,000 35 $3 340

AUGUST 1988 LANCIA FLAMINIA SUPER SPORT

Being kind, you might describe the Zagato-bodied Flaminia as ‘bold’ or ‘purposeful’. Perhaps you might also wonder why these cars have become significantly more valuable than the GT version from rival coachbuilder Touring. The clue is right there in the advertisement: just 150 Super Sports built between 1964 and ’67, of which a couple maybe found their way to Australia as new cars.

The USA was a more popular destination and a recent auction saw one in restored condition make over $190,000.

SINCE THEN: A very hard car to value given so few come up for sale and prices at auction can vary significantly.

With some certainty though we would expect $300,000 to be possible for a car like this.

$25,000 $220- 250,000

DECEMBER 1998 HOLDEN HK GTS327

If you weren’t alive back in 1968 you may not truly understand the effect this shape had on car pervs of all ages and persuasions. We had seen Mustangs and Camaros come in from the USA but this pillarless beauty was home-grown Aussie exotica and even Ford enthusiasts were excited. Thirty years after the HK version was released, a GTS that arguably was the best in existence appeared in at around six times original cost. A decade later you could have added a zero to the price and still found buyers.

SINCE THEN: Gasps were heard clear across the country when a GTS327 sold for more than any Monaro in history. Whether $300,000 represents a new bench-mark is something we won’t know until the next one sells.

$53,000 $145-175,000

SEPTEMBER 1999 LAMBORGHINI URRACO P300

Although seen as a Porsche and Ferrari GT4 rival, the Urraco is a more complex and sophisticated car. 2.5-litre versions didn’t have the mumbo to match their style but the 3.0-litre did enough to rate as half-sized but not half-baked supercar. They were expensive when new arriving during a time of global privation that made P300s scarce. Of the 205 made, only 38 were RHD and at least one Australian-delivered car popped up a few years ago in Britain. LHD models sell in the region of US$60,000 and can be registered here without issue.

SINCE THEN: The P300 is so scarce that buyers of exotica sometimes overlook it. US sales set the benchmark and prices from there confirm that cars selling here at around $170,000 should have a good chance.