HOT SHOTS

PACKED WITH QUALITY METAL, FROM TRAD RODS TO ELITE CUSTOMS, THE 46TH QUEENSLAND HOT ROD SHOW SAW THE EVENT GO FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH

STORY DALE HABERFIELD & BRETT COLLINGWOOD

T H E Q U E E N S L A N D H O T R O D S H OW

PACKED WITH QUALITY METAL, FROM TRAD RODS TO ELITE CUSTOMS, THE 46TH QUEENSLAND HOT ROD SHOW SAW THE EVENT GO FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH

THE Queensland Hot Rod Show took over the Brisbane Convention Centre in late May, the 46th running of the event and the second time it’s been held at the South Bank venue. Organised by the Queensland Hot Rod Promotions crew, the weekend-long show saw around 130 rods, bikes and customs filling the hall, with some of the hottest rides in the country making the trek to the Sunshine State.

From traditional flathead-powered hot rods to stateof- the-art street elite marvels boasting donks worth as much as your mortgage, there was literally something for everyone. Airbrushing and pinstriping demos, a charity auction in support of Youngcare, and the Miss Queensland Hot Rod Show pin-up contest added to the fun.

For those displaying their car, the stakes were high; the show’s affiliation with MotorActive meant that entrants had the chance to qualify as Meguiar’s Superstars finalists for this year’s MotorEx. Four worthy cars were chosen from this year’s field by MotorActive’s Owen Webb to step up to the next level: Josh Cronin’s 1932 Ford coupe; Josh Evans’s 1931 Ford Victoria; Sonia Piggins’s 1934 Ford roadster; and Mike Renfrey’s 1933 Ford roadster (see SM Hot Rod #16 for the full feature on this amazing ride).

For young Josh Cronin and his family, earning a Superstars spot was a bittersweet triumph. He started building his ’32 Ford Deluxe with his dad

F R O M TR AD ITI ON AL HOT R O D S TO STR E E T E LITE MAR VE LS, TH E R E W A S SO METH I N G FOR EVE RYO N E

1: Steve Hopes won top honours in the Street Machine class with his twin-turbo 1968 Chevy Camaro, SINISTR 2: This wild unfinished VG Valiant coupe was entered by BMV Engineering on behalf of Jason Behan and Kellie Farraway. So far the big Val has been treated to a full chassis with four-link rear end, independent front, twin-skinned floors, wrapped sills, smoothed bumpers and a sheeted engine bay housing a 514ci big-block. For the full story on the car check out the feature we ran last issue 3: Owned by Gary and Di Ullmann, RATN8R was built from a 1942 Chevy truck by Ullmann Engineering as a tribute to Gary’s grandfather.

The build brief was to construct a hot rod from leftover parts and to do it all themselves. Engine is a 235 Chev six, with a four-speed crash-box and ’55 Eaton two-speed diff 4 & 5: Brisbane’s Reece Pagel owns the neat street sleeper ’69 HT Kingswood on the right, running a 368ci Holden stroker, manualised T400 and nine-inch. It was displayed beside Reece’s mum Sandra’s recently finished ’63 VW Beetle (left).

Dual feature soon! 6: Paul McMullin finished his all-steel ’31 Ford just hours before hauling it to show in Sydney and then back for the Queensland Hot Rod Show.

Finished in PPG Claret, the genuine five-window coupe is a time capsule of nostalgia rodding, sporting a 59A flathead, triple 97s and 1940 banjo diff 7: Street Machine’s artist-inresidence Aden Jacobi doing what he does best

Paul in 2013. But Paul passed away during the build, so Josh completed the C&W-bodied deuce with the talent of East Coast Race Cars and a host of friends. As well as a MotorEx berth, the 6/71-blown 350ci SBCpowered coupe earned a well-deserved second in class and a spot in the Top 10.

One car that commanded attention was the Polynesian surf wagon called Swell, which we featured last issue. Owned by Gavan Starr- Thomas, the unusual ride has been fashioned from a 1962 Willys Jeep wagon that’s been chopped nine inches and mated to modified ’37 Willys front sheet metal and ’39 Willys rear guards. It’s powered by a LM7 5.4L

Chevy backed by a 4L60E trans and nine-inch diff.

Another recent SM feature car (May ’16) on show was Michael Ellard’s LS1-motivated 1992 Holden Rodeo mini-truck. From the HOK Brandywine exterior to the myriad body mods and killer stance provided by AccuAir self-levelling airbags, it’s a pure TKO. Copper-coated 19- and 20-inch Intro hoops complement the copper hard lines and cream and brandy leather interior.

There were some killer street machines at this year’s event too, including Steve Chaplin’s turbo 13BT-powered 1973 Mazda RX-3, ANGRY3. But in the end it was the 1968 Camaro of Steve Hopes that took out Top Street Machine at QHRS 2016. With an immaculate engine bay, interior and paintjob, the car’s been a trophy magnet of late, having also won Top Show Car at the Victorian Hot Rod Show earlier in the year.

O N E CAR TH AT C O M MA N D E D AT TE NTI O N WAS TH E P O LYN E SIA N S U R F WAGON CALLE D SWE LL

Another awesome street machine, Greg & Julie Holmes’s 1970 Plymouth Barracuda, had a crowd around it all weekend, so it was no surprise that it ended up with the People’s Choice award. Originally built by Graeme Cowin, the car was crowned Street Machine Of The Year 2010, and under Greg and Julie’s custodianship it has continued to rake in the silverware, including a big haul at Summernats 29: Top Bodywork, Top Standard Paint, Top Pro Custom and a Top 10 Elite spot.

Both Steve’s Camaro and Greg and Julie’s ’Cuda were two of the three cars in the running for the Milty Award at this year’s QHRS. Named in honour of the late Milton Adey – prominent Queensland drag racing identity, QHRS supporter and for many years the voice of the Summernats burnout pad – the award, which comes with a $3000 cheque and trophy sponsored by Pat’s Pro Restos, is given to the most outstanding vehicle of the show. Last year the inaugural Milty was awarded to Nathan Borg and his Summernats 28 Grand Champion-winning Datsun 1200. This year, though, it was given to Peter Elliot for his incredibly clean Deuce Customs-bodied 1934 Ford tudor, dubbed Simplicity. In addition, Peter scored Top Hot Rod, Top Tudor, Best Standard Paint, Best Interior and Best Undercarriage.

All in all, this year’s Queensland Hot Rod Show was a doozy. The move to the Convention Centre from the show’s former home at the RNA Showgrounds looks to be a winner, and the quality of vehicles on show proved the event’s vitality and diversity is undiminished. It’s a testament to the hard work of the Queensland Hot Rod Promotions team, who continue to be proud flag-bearers for the sport of hot rodding in Queensland. s

THE Q U A LIT Y O F VE H I CLE S ON SH OW PR O VED TH E E V E NT’S V ITALIT Y AN D D IV E RS IT Y IS U N D IM I NI SH E D

T O P 1 0

PETER ELLIOT

1934 FORD TUDOR

PETER & PAT FRITSCH

1934 FORD FIVE-WINDOW COUPE

STEVE HOPES

1968 CHEVROLET CAMARO

JEFFREY & SUE WHALAN

1932 FORD THREE-WINDOW COUPE

JASON COOKE

1965 XP FALCON

DENNIS & LUKE DEANE

1962 PONTIAC LAURENTIAN

STEVE CHAPLIN

1973 MAZDA RX-3

GREG & JULIE HOLMES

1970 PLYMOUTH BARRACUDA

MIKE RENFREY

1933 FORD ROADSTER

JOSH CRONIN

1932 FORD DELUXE COUPE