DISCOVERY DECODED

LAND ROVER’S NEW DISCOVERY COMES IN A RANGE OF MODELS WITH DIFFERENT FEATURES AND COMPLEX OPTIONS LISTS. WE SORT OUT WHAT YOU NEED TO GET DIRTY!

WORDS FRASER STRONACH

IF YOU’RE looking for the least expensive way to get into the all-new Discovery (effectively a ‘Discovery 5’ but just Discovery by name) you’ll have to wait until late 2017 when the base-spec ‘S’ models arrive. If you want something sooner, like midyear, the more expensive SE is your entry point.

If you’re prepared for the end-of-year wait, prices for the Discovery S start at $65,900 for the 132kW four-cylinder Td4 engine in a white, coil-spring five-seater with manual-adjust cloth seats.

However, the Td4 engine can’t be had with dual-range gearing at any specification level, which limits its appeal as a 4x4.

If you want dual-range gearing – and why wouldn’t you? – you’ll at least need the more powerful 177kW/500Nm Sd4 ‘Ingenium’ four-cylinder, which starts at $71,560 in the S. From there, dualrange gearing is a relatively inexpensive $920 option.

If you’re planning serious off-roading you’ll also need the $1080 rear E-locker, while height-adjustable air suspension – which provides 63mm more clearance (and flatter on-road handing) – is another $2060. So that’s $75,620 before government taxes and dealer charges to get you into a new base-spec Disco that’s optimised for off-road work. If you then want maximum grunt in that same vehicle then the 190kW/600Nm Td6 will be another $7K, or $82,620 (plus on-roads) in total.

If you don’t wish to wait until years’ end for the lessexpensive S model and you want an off-road-ready Disco then the SE Sd4 is your entry point. It starts at $83,450, plus on-roads. Over the S, the SE brings dual-range gearing and the height-adjustable suspension as standard, but for max off-road attack you’ll still need $1080 for the rear E-locker. So that’s $84,530. From there you can add another $7K for the Td6 engine to take it to $91,530.

At that point you’re at a Disco with max off-road ability and

max on-road performance.

Aside from having dualrange gearing and heightadjustability as standard, the SE also brings a fair bit of extra kit over the S. This includes leather, electric seat adjust, sat-nav, dual-zone climate control, a better sound system, rain-sensing wipers, LED headlights with DRLs, and pre-fitted towing equipment.

Over the S, the SE also offers Terrain Response 2 as a $2060 option. Terrain Response 2 builds on the standard Terrain Response system fitted to the S and SE by giving the driver the option of an ‘Auto’ mode where the system will automatically switch between the various terrain modes such as Sand, Rock Crawling and Mud.

As with the regular Terrain Response system, Terrain Response 2 also allows the driver to manually select the various terrain modes.

At this point with the SE Td6 you’re still in a white fiveseater.

Seven seats add $4540 (more on lower-spec cars) while paint colours other than white also add more cost.

If you have even more cash to throw around then there’s plenty to spend on more luxury and convenience features of the more expensive HSE, HSE Luxury and First Edition models.

From there on is a mindboggling range of additional option packs, but you really won’t do better in terms of off-road ability.

IF YOU WANT DUAL-RANGE GEARING, YOU’LL NEED THE SD4

RANGE AND PRICING

S TD4 $65,960 / $71,560 (5-seat/7 seat) SD4 $71,560 / $77,960 TD6 $78,560 / $84,960 SE TD4 $77,050 / $81,590 (5-seat/7 seat) SD4 $83,450 / $87,990 TD6 $90,450 / $94,990 HSE TD4 $87,150 / $90,550 (5-seat/7 seat) SD4 $93,550 / $96,950 TD6 $100,550 / $103,950 HSE LUXURY TD4 $100,950 / $104,350 (5-seat/7 seat) SD4 $107,350 / $110,750 TD6 $114,350 / $117,750 FIRST EDITION TD6 $132,160